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problem, the thing that is really holding the economy back? if so then you had a bad week. >> first jobs report of the year. >> fourth quarter gdp numbers are down. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> government spending does actually help the economy. >> a trillion dollar stimulus bill, supposed to create jobs. >> we need to start solving the actual problem. >> we need to cut spending. >> cutting. >> cutting very popular social insurance programs. medicaid, medicare, social security, health care. >> there is another economic reason why we need reform. >> let's help to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. >> as congress gets ready to tackle the immigration, there will be a snag. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> doesn't want to do anything on comprehensive immigration reform. >> what would you do about immigration? >> how to deal with border security. >> first we strengthen the borders. >> they have to be reasonable how they do it. >> we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. >> the economy is back in the spotlight. >> government does
economy, and the influence of our diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remain unrivaled. no, it is because as the world has changed, so to have a level -- the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think about it like this. truman and acheson were killed in the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. tellers or a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers. that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. time takes its toll, even on the greatest edifice. we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank gehry than formal greek. some of his work at first might appear have howser. in fact, it is highly intentional -- half hazard. in fact, it is highly intentional and sophisticated. today, we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership. as we saw from the intervention to stop the massacre in libya to the rate at brought osama bin laden to justice, there will always be times when
a car that is safe while also trying to meet these fuel economy standards? any comments on that? >> yeah, i guess i will jump in. yeah, so safety is first party for all auto manufacturers. there is a tension between, particularly in terms of weight, adding weight to vehicles for various safety features, not only regulations demand but also the consumers want and demand. and the weight is a very important factor in trying to improve fuel economy of the vehicles. i think fundamentally from toyotas of you, you can do both. you can have efficiency, lower carbon and safe vehicles. i think the key is the pace at which these two issues are progressed, with respect to one another. so, you know, having a mid \50{l1}s{l0}\'50{l1}s{l0} fuel economy car in 2025 communism is there a long enough time to think that we can engineer vehicles, including the safety future that will be acquired in a way that these vehicles will be safe or for people to drive? i think it comes down to balancing sort of the timing with which we are doing these things. to make sure the fuel economy reductions if you'll don't g
of time will essential double fuel economy up to 54.5 miles per gallon. it does it in a way that collaborates with the automakers themselves in a way that will produce the kind of cars that are safe and effective and perform the way that american consumers want to see. will really provide tremendous benefit. so it's a win for everyone and that i think is my basic message. if you look at on the climate change side, whether we're we ae talking about is over the course of 2012-2025, those vehicles are going to reduce their carbon pollution by 6 billion metric tons. we're talking about 12 billion barrels of oil saved. these are numbers that are not to be sneezed at, ladies and gentlemen. these are very large benefits to society. in terms of automakers can we saw the automakers standing up for the president. we saw them touting this initiative because they knew they could be producing cars that were more efficient and that consumers would want to purchase. and on the consumer side, perhaps consumers here are the biggest winners of all. they are going to get cars that again perfor
and cuts in defense spending. it did not announce any new action to stimulate the economy. wall street reacted by giving up some of its recent gains. the dow jones industrial average lost 44 points to close at 13,910. the nasdaq fell 11 points to close at 3,142. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: whither the economy? that's been the question for quite a while now. today, there was a surprising and perhaps confusing new twist. the commerce department reported that gross domestic product actually shrank in the last quarter of 2012. the drop was small, one tenth of a percent. but it was still the first time economic output had fallen in three and a half years. government spending dropped, most dramatically in the defense sector. the report, though, also contained some positive developments: consumer spending and business investment were both up. and yesterday, the so-called case-shiller index found that housing prices grew in 20 major cities by an average of 5.5% over the previous year. it was the biggest gain in six years. we talk it through, with joe
to the economy. a day after the dow closed above the 14,000 mark for the first time since before the financial crisis. >> we are poised to grow in 2013. and the real signs of progress. home prices are starting to climb again. car sales are at a five-year high. manufacturing is roaring back. our businesses created 2.2 million jobs last year. and we just learned that our economy created more jobs over the last few months than economists originally thought. >> now, former senator scott brown says he will not run on a special senate election in massachusetts. it's a setback. republicans who hope to win the seat vacated by secretary of state john kerry. brown lost hre-election bid to elizabeth warren in november. for more on the response to the milestone week to the dow, let's go to kristen welker at the white house for us. good saturday morning to you. what is the take on the latest economic news, after the rocky start with the negative gdp number? >> good morning, alex. a real mixed bag this week. the white house responding as they typically do, when we get one of these jobs reports or gdp report
from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest: we are seeing an economy that is recovering slowly from the crisis and recession of 2008 and 2009. we can put a number of side for a minute because that is about investment income. even over the long time horizon, we are seeing incomes rise. people are earning more money. people are starting to put people back to work. certainly, this is not a happy days are here again and everything is fine. we are not healed but it is making progress in that direction. host: take a look at a lot of factors. it look at wages and income and rental income. you look at investment income as a whole. that paints a picture of where americans are financially. guest: that's right. you can't buy the things you need if you don't have income. for some, that is a paycheck from their job or from retirees, social security benefits. or for people who have invested a lot, it might be invested -- investment income dividends. wherever it comes from, that is the core of how you buy the things you need and want. host: our guests will take a loo
numbers announced yesterday. the economy added 150,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9%, which is what we have there on our map this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times -- on our map. this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times. patrick, explain how that works, more jobs added, but the unemployment rate goes up. guest: the economy needs to add up -- needs to create enough jobs to make up for people coming into the labour market. this month, we fell slightly short of getting there. it is worth noting, the unemployment rate has a margin for error of 0.2%. when it picks up a 0.1%, we say, it is essentially unchanged. there is a wiggle room for measurements. it is right around par. host: when these numbers come out, the numbers come out, and there is an explanation that they can be adjusted in a month or so down the road trips -- road. guest: tell us about -- as more data comes in, debris-estimate how many jobs came in, and for december, they went from 155,000 jobs to 196,000 jobs. and in november, job growth was showing 146,000 jobs
's economy. david cay johnston on today's troubling gdp report. >>> bobby jindal breaks his own rule. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. >> find out how the poor in his state are about to start suffering on friday. >>> and brand-new polling proves again that we're living in a center-left country. tonight i'll tell you why it's up to one person to keep it that way. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. an emotional scene on capitol hill today. former congresswoman gabrielle giffords returned to congress for a senate hearing on gun violence. two years ago, giffords was shot in the head during a shooting spree that killed six people in tucson, arizona. the 71 words gifford spoke today did not come easy for her. but her message is one every american needs to hear. >> thank you for inviting me. here today. this is an important conversation for our children, for our communities, for democrats and republicans. speaking is difficult, but i need to say something important. violence is a big problem. too many children are dying. too many children. we must do somethin
. everything we do. there is nothing else that impact our economy so directly as energy. whether it is individuals that are struggling to fill up their gas tanks, pay their electric bills, whether it is business leaders making decisions on investments based on the cost of power server farms or smelters, we recognize lower cost is better and that's what everybody is seeking. there are those who would have you believe that the best way to reduce energy's direct cost is simply to raise the direct cost so that we discourage energy use. my friends, this is a self- defeating policy. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely keep. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs by driving up these prices, i would suggest this is a policy that is doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that? our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sour
past the hour. ♪ ♪ stuart: the financial times headline, u.s. slips into reverse. the economy is shrinking. the word recession is on the table. we have the worst so-called recovery in generations. our debt goes up by a trillion a year. the white house says the republicans are to blame, spending cuts are to blame. super storm sandy is to blame. excuses. the numbers are what they are. the economy is sinking. president obama's policies seem to be failing. his approval rating is at a three year high. arnie and company about to begin. aving triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmission. [ coyote howls ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capt
to bring down the debt. not just as a share of economy, but overall. you're right. it doesn't bring down the debt. at all. mr. speaker, that's the conflict that we face here as a people, as a country, not as republicans, not as democrats, but as a people. on the one hand, what our politicians are saying is we're going to use the money to pay down our debt. but what the reality is is that proposers are coming out today that never, ever, ever pay down a penny of debt. now, mr. speaker, if you want to see that for yourself, you can look. the president's budget each year is posted online, on the o.m.b. website. the first one he submitted, i hold the cover page here, was called a new era of responsibility. it was the first budget that the president ever submitted. but as i go through that budget, mr. speaker, what i see is projects -- proximates for 2020, for 20 -- projections for 2020, for 2030, for 2040, for 260 and for 2080 -- 20 of 6 -- 2060 and for 2080. you hear that, you have children. 2020, 2030, 2040, 2060 and 2080. and in each one of those years, according to the president's budget,
be paid. when that goes into the family checkbook, it will go right in to the economy which we need right now. to buy shoes, to buy food, to do all the things that occur in the real economy. so we think it's great social policy, but we think it's an economic mandate. >> and senator boxer, that is a fact because with $10,000 less a year, then they earned with men, women could buy, if they had that money, 92 weeks of groceries or 13 months of rent or 39 months of family health insurance premium. i mean, we're talking food, housing, health care. this isn't just a little extra money. this is vital, especially for single moms. >> it is so critical. and it is, you know, what happens is we have a consumer-driven economy. about 70% of our economy depends on the consumer going out and spending. so when senator mikulski describes this, she's exactly right. an when you take it to a further level, it's critical. it's critical for the family. it's critical for retirement. it's critical for the economy. so all of this means we're going to have a real strong push. and i think this year, maybe we'll get
want the sequester actually to go forward which would put the breaks on the economy at least to an extent and drive more people back into bonds. >> reporter: others say any return to bonds may be short- lived, as the u.s. economy is showing new signs of strength. >> i think we expect more improvements, moderate improvements. but, you know overall that's usually a cause or thought that rates could go higher. and, in that regard it's probably not a market that will have the same sort of returns that we've seen over the past two years. >> reporter: so, it seems most agreehe bond market i unlikely to be a cash cow for investors going forward. at the same time, however, worries about a bond market bubble seem unfounded. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report." >> susie: immigration reform takes center stage this week. a group of senate democrats and republicans agreed today on what they called a framework for comprehensive immigration reform. tomorrow, president obama heads to las vegas to give a policy speech on immigration. with washington focused on immigration, citizenship fo
the american economy and strengthen american families. third, creating an effective employment verification system that will prevent identity theft and and the hiring of future unauthorized workers. leslie, an approved process for admitting future workers to serve the nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe that this will be the year that congress finally gets this done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there has been more political risk in opposing immigration reform than supporting it. host: senator chuck schumer, outlining the details of the immigration reform agreement so far. here is the headline from "roll call," this morning. host: here to talk more about this story, the staff writer at "roll-call," humberto sanchez. have democrats been able to move the ball forward? caller: it appears so, but principle is a big step forward. senator schumer mentioned that. it has been tried for a couple of
economy moving again instead of what seemed to be endless partisan struggles over secondary issues? and what i wanted to speak to today was a bipartisan bill which i'm introducing which focuses on how to help create innovation focused jobs again in the united states. as you know all too well, madam president, our economic recovery has been slower than we would hope, although it's been steady, there are still far too many americans out of work. in my home state of delaware, more than 30,000. but we are building our way ba back. so the task before us is to think not just about an immediate economic crisis but to take a breath i think and instead focus strategically on the long-term fewer, to take -- long-term future, to take an account of what kind of economy we want to build for our children, for our grandchildren, for the america of today and tomorrow. the engine of our nation's greatest economic successes has always been innovation. from the light bulb to the search engine, american inventors and innovators, those who've taken risks and started companies, have created jobs by the
about uncertainties for the economy going forward and fiscal uncertainty more importantly noted until washington can get it right it might be difficult for businesses to function properly and grow, and he actually made it very obvious when he last spoke. a look at the one-year chart down 2.1%. lori: thank you. melissa: stocks struggling after a flurry of jobless claims. december personal income grew by the largest amount in eight years, held by dividend payouts as everybody tries to avoid higher tax rates on those. the latest reading on manufacturing came in the best level in nine months. that is positive. following the gdp report. that is not good. what does it say about the recovery? it is confusing. joining me now. we go through the list, it is basically all bad except the chicago pmi number. what is your take? >> my view is the latest data suggests this remains the olympus economic recovery since the second world war and we ought to be happy the u.s. economy grows by 2% once again in 2013. this is an economy growth wise that is simply moving sideways. melissa: sideways even is opt
war and 20 century popular culture. >> next common discussion in the u.s. economy and why some american could be holding back from investing or to trust issues concerning the government and financial site there. or "washington journal," this is 15 minutes. >> host: this history and for what "the wall street journal," chief economic correspondent. welcome. you wrote a piece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what we're trying to do? >> guest: we usually talk about things but budget deficits and trade deficits with things we can measure. what i'm talking about is the breakdown of trust in american society. it would take her in institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys by gallup for the pew institute that americans have, it's a very important institution including the media newspaper, television, congress, banks, large corporations, public school, public union. if all been going down for many years and allowed them, declining interest intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis and there's a lot of re
of the economy and financial crisis, that is what we are asking about you this morning, if the financial crisis has delayed those plants for you. give us a call. robert, clinton, md., you are on, sir. caller: 401k, in the early part of november my three kids were named the beneficiaries. we did all the paperwork. here it is, since february 4, and i have not got the money yet. the company that has the 401k, first of all, you cannot find them. i work in the credit union. they would not give you any information about the company that had the 401k. here it is, the fourth, and they still have not got the money. you have got to wait a long time to get your money. host: tell us a little bit about your plans, because of the limbo you are in. what does that mean for you? caller how it means i have to be very careful about four hope -- 401k. if something happened to me, i would release the money to my kids or something like that. if they needed it right away, they could get it, but they still have not received the money. i still do not know how these things work. because of the interest, i do not know. t
, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap to provide food for their families. it is a lifeline for these 47 million people who struggle to make ends meet. i don't deny this is a big number, but it's a big number because it's a big problem. mr. speaker, america's hunger problem will be dramatically worse without snap. just imagine what this country would look like if we didn't have the safety net that snap provides for low-income families in
of immigrants, 80% at least are low education, low skilled, we're a post industrial economy, not clear what the new economy is, we are not an steel economy more an -- we're not an industrial economy more an agricultural one. no one has provided the answer to that. >> one heck of a quandry. >> before i let you go, marko rubio, one of the biggest names of the republican pushing for this, this is a win-win for president to your point but it seems like a lose-lose for g.o.p., can he come out smelling like a rose. >> of course senator rubio is thinking about his position went the party, he is trying to strike some middle ground against anti-immigration absolutists on one side, and business community on the other. it seems that this comes to border enforcement, if rubio can convince republican primary voter ease is for border enforcement first, he comes out well. >> the president will come out well, and the rest of us will have one big tab, what the heck, put it with the rest of them, thank you, tucker. >> is there a new sheriff in town. >> >> a calling in to sheriff, nobody messes with joe. >> t
? >> guest: what i see is in an economy that isn't growing fast enough to produce many jobs. the unemployment rate was 7.8% in december, and, you know, it had looked like it was moving down and now we see that it pops up. and the reason for that is 157,000 jobs created in an economy with 140 million workers is not a lot. it's not enough to keep up with growth in the labor force, so, you know, this is a fundamental problem in our economy. you might argue the fundamental problem in our economy right now is that we're not growing fast enough to bring the unemployment rate down to levels that most americans would find acceptable. and we can have a loan discussion about -- long discussion about why we're not growing fast enough. you know, you could argue that the economy needs more investment, that the government should be providing more stimulus. you could argue the government is getting in the way. you can also argue that it's a res due of the financial crisis. >> host: the number of employed persons was -- little changed in january. the number of long-term unem employed unchanged to 4.7 million
, the budget was lower than when he came in. that is the story now. how did he do that? did the economy grow a lot? unemployment was below 5%. the budget was balanced because of his own parsimony. how did he manage to make the budget go lower? how did that help the economy? it was a lot, he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> the life of the 30th president of the united states, "coolidge," on sunday, 8:00, on q&a. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are back with congressman mcdermott, the ranking democrat on the house subcommittee. let me read to you from "the national journal bailey," and what they had to say about sequestration -- national journal daily," and what they had to say about sequestration. host: true, accurate reporting? caller: -- guest: as far as what i can tell, that is exactly what is happening. unfortunately for the american people, the leadership on the republican side is still acting as though the election never occurred. they have got to except that the people have said that they once what obama is doing. they reelected him overwhelmingly. and t
. and we just learned that our economy created more jobs over the last few months than economists originally thought. >> hey, guys, holding back on front page politics and back to alabama now where there's a news conference on that hostage situation. let's take a listen. >> he's also allowed us to provide coloring books, medication, toys. i want to thank him for taking care of our child. that's very important. at this time i'm going to let you ask me a couple of questions. but you know it needs to be brief. there's very limited -- i'm limited to what i can give you. >> why medication? >> ma'am, i can't release that. >> do we know if he's actually taking it? >> what do we know about the actual state of the child? >> we can only do a couple. >> does he have television and electricity? >> we don't have a lot of details of that, okay? >> [ inaudible ] bus driver -- hit an emergency button inside the bus to call police. >> i don't have any information about that. >> can you tell us anything about your conversations with the suspect? >> we've been in constant communication with mr. dyke
economy, this congress said no, our motto would be in god we trust. and when i was a young boy, john kennedy facing the cuban missile crisis said this, the guiding principle of this country has always been, is today and will forever be in god we trust. mr. speaker, with that great history of faith, why is it that faith is under attack so much across this nation? well, mr. speaker, tune in, because in a few weeks, we will be back on this floor and we'll tell you who's doing it and why they are doing it and what we need to do to stop it. i thank you and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from new york, mr. jeverries is recognized for 60 -- mr. jeffries is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. jeffries: i ask for unanimous consent that the -- be entered into the record a letter from the distinguished gentlelady from texas, mrs. johnson. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. jeffries: today we are here as members o
that governors and state legislatures and state lawmakers are focussing on things like this and not the economy and jobs, the worse off it is for them. >> you are starting to see, interestingly, a bit of a pullback by some of the republicans even on these democracy issues, even on voting. governor rick scott in florida who was behind the laws that made it impossible for that well known radical sect, the league of women voters of florida. >> voter registration. >> they are behind those laws which were blocked by the courts. now rick scott has come in and said, you know what, we need to expand early voting. we need to go a different way because he knows that the voters actually will vote based on this, and, you know, this is what i hope is a potential glimmer of possibility for something to move forward. president obama in his inaugural address and on election night said we need to do something about the way we run elections. >> indeed we do. >> that's a chance the country ought to try to take because not to rig the game, but to take kind of commonsense steps to modernize voter registration. >> g
of opportunity. now is the time to do this so we can strengthen our economy and strengthen our country's future. think about it. if we design ourselves as a nation of immigrants. that's who we are in our bones. the promise we see in those who come here from every corner of the globe that has always been one of our greatest strengths. it keeps our work force young. it keeps our country on the cutting edge and helped grow the biggest economic engifrn known. it helped grow businesses like google andrea hue. created entire new industries that in turn created new jobs and prosperity for our citizens. in recent years one in four high-tech startups in america were founded by immigrants. one in four small business owners 'n including here in nevada speaking up and want to share the opportunity with other americans. we all know that today we have an immigration system that is out of date and badly broken. it is growing our economy and strengthening our middle class. we have 11 million undocumented immigrants in america. 11 million men and women from all over the world who live their lives in the shadows
joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i began looking at what other cities around america were doing. i came over to mayor bloomberg, who i called the obi-wan kenobi of mayors. all of us young padawans come to see what is going on over here. i could not wait to talk about climate change. the time is now. we just focus on cities where the carbon output is significant. if we do pragmatic things, we are going to make change. he started showing me programs he
street comes amid disappointing economic news. the u.s. economy slowing signs of slowing down. the government says the economy sharply contracted in the fourth quarter of 2012 growing at only one tent of tenth. they say it is heading to greece on steroids. what is about this last quarter, steve, what caused the shrinkage. >> wall street is doing great, main street isn't doing so well. this new report suggests that this economy still has not really fully recovered from the financial crisis four years ago, in fact the thing that is really disturbing here, jon is the economy has been slowing down over the last six months or so. it's not gaining momentum as you would expect. and so the numbers are just very troubling. the biggest decline, by the way, was in defense spending. the private sector gdp was up a bit, not much about 1.5%. jon: a lot of people who constantly look to cut the defense budget, cut defense spending, chop out this program or that program, this is a cautionary tale. >> look i actually think cutting government spending is good for the economy because it frees up
to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready o with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ but, dad, you've got... [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you the nonmusical question, why are you awake? i've got one right here somebody tweeted in. lori, very close watcher of the cut-aways on the program, she tweets,@steverattner working diligently on his charts. unfortun
and economy. on the right, it's now complete orthodoxy that do-gooder liberals, especially former representative barney frank, somehow caused the financial disaster by forcing helpless bankers to lend to those people." and they're all so threatening to filibuster the appointment of cordray. they just won't let this newbaunew bureau do its job. they don't want it around. >> this is one that we have to agree with krugman. he's right. the fact is that out of all -- without relitigating how we got into the financial crisis and all the rest of it, the fact is that a lot of bad stuff happened. they set up a consumer financial protection agency in order to protect consumers just the way we have various other agencies that protect consumers from other things. and it was passed in a law. and now the republicans are basically saying we're not going to confirm anybody. and i don't think that's sort of playing fair. >> i saw a piece the other day that talked about -- a conference i think that you were at in washington where bill kristol talked about you've got people looking back at how the r
. the economy is starting to improve. i want to see it improve even faster. and in a broader sense, so that those who are at the lower end of the economic scale, including african-americans, latino americans and others can start to come up. ultimately, those numbers that you just cited are going to be fixed by an improving economy and an economy that is spread out more. and more and more african-americans will benefit and latino americans if they also get the education needed for the more demanding jobs. >> bill: you seem to be voting again on hope in 12 because we haven't seen an economic improvement in this country very much. and, in addition, the big spending policies of the democratic party and the president have driven the debt as you know to close to $17 trillion and he is the biggest spending president in history. you said something very interesting. education. we spend more per capita on education than any other country in the world than switzerland. all right? it isn't the money. but the money continues to flow. it's the discipline. it's the descent congratulation of the famil
'll run for re-election. >> the economy added 150,000 new jobs last month according to the department of labor. it also released data that suggested hiring was stronger in the past two years than previously thought. employers added an average of 180,000 jobs per month in 2011 and 2012. that's up from previous estimates of 150,000 jobs a month. the unemployment rate did jump from 7.8% to 7.9%. >>> meantime, the auto industry showing off its latest innovations in our region right now. the 2013 washington auto show begins today. news4's megan mcgrath shows us they drive home the point that there's a lot to drive home. >> reporter: i wish i'd let me drive them, but it's been a fixture in this town for decades, it is always something new, this year is no different. more than 700 new vehicles from 14 manufacturers. it you're looking for luxury cars, this is interesting. if years past, if you wanted a luxury car, you had to traps around to the different manufacturers. we have the range rovers, behind us the bmws and the cadillacs right behind me now. automatic lot of people interested in the
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